Dispirited Tiger Beetle
Dispirited Tiger Beetle
Dispirited Tiger Beetle
Dispirited Tiger Beetle
Dispirited Tiger Beetle
Dispirited Tiger Beetle

Dispirited Tiger Beetle Cicindela depressula eureka

The Dispirited Tiger Beetle is named for the less-spirited “elbow” on the middle band. In most individuals, this band bends smoothly and is unbroken. The middle band of the Oregon Tiger Beetle, on the other hand, usually has a very “bony” elbow and the band is often broken. C. d. eureka also lacks the “eyebrow” bristles characteristic of C. o. oregona (6).
Colors vary from green to brown, and may depend somewhat on the angle of the photo. C. d. eureka appears not to stand so tall as C. o. oregona (the so-called stilting behavior).

Image 5 shows Cicindela depressula eureka mating. Note the aedeagus, or sperm transfer tube, brownish on the lower left.

In this video, an individual is digging an excavation in the sand. I saw these oval, cavelike holes scattered on the sand in this location.

Two subspecies probably occur on the Olympic Peninsula, C. d. depressula in the high country and C. d. eureka at lower elevations along rivers. These photos come from the upper end of Lake Mills on the Elwha river, about 500 ft. elevation.

C.d. depressula are numerous in gravely areas of trails at Mount Rainier, Paradise area. Photo

On the Olympic Peninsula, I’ve only seen C. d. eureka occurring along with C. o. oregona, and always in much smaller numbers.