ONH

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    1 - Long-horned Beetles mating Grammoptera sp. on wild rose.

    05/22/2010 Railroad Bridge Park, Sequim, WA

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    2 - Necydalis laevicollis.

    08/05/2010 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    3 - Long-horned Beetle feeding on pollen of cultivated rhododendron.

    07/05/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    4 - Long-horned Beetles mating.

    08/03/2011 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    5 - Long-horned Beetle.

    07/04/2014 Obstruction Point Road near the Cox Valley Trailhead, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    6 - Long-horned Beetles mating.

    07/05/2009 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    7 - Zooming in on slide 6, you can see the transparent, yellowish sperm-transfer tube of the male, called the aedeagus.

    07/05/2009 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    8 - Whitespotted Sawyers clearly show the long antennae, with long segments, typical of the family.

    09/06/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    9 - Red-oak Borer larvae, Enaphalodes rufulus, create huge galleries under oak bark in the eastern United States.

    11/07/2004 Ozark Mountains, Arkansas

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    10 - Red-oak Borer larva Enaphalodes rufulus.

    11/07/2004 Ozark Mountains, Arkansas

Long-horned beetles are common on the north Olympic Peninsula in the spring and summer. We see them on flowers or trees in the Hurricane Ridge area, as well as on flowers or even on the shingles of our house in the northern foothills of the Olympics. We have photographed a few species in addition to the ones on this page (see menu).

Some cerambycid larvae can be destructive to trees. The larva of the Red Oak Borer, Enaphalodes rufulus, an eastern and midwestern species, excavates huge galleries under the bark of oak trees (slides 9 and 10). See Fred Stephen’s site for more about Red Oak Borers. I took these photos during a field trip in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas in 2004 as part of a CASW New Horizons meeting.