ONH

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  • nisquallia1985
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    1 - Nisquallia olympica just emerged nymph, first instar.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    2 - Nisquallia olympica nymph feeding on Davidson’s Penstemon flower Penstemon davidsonii. This is an early instar about 6 mm long. Adult females are about 25 mm long.

    06/23/2009 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

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    3 - Nisquallia olympica nymph feeding on Davidson’s Penstemon flower, full frame to show the whole flower.

    06/23/2009 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

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    4 - Nisquallia olympica nymph feeding on Davidson’s Penstemon flower. The same individual shown in slides 2 and 3.

    06/23/2009 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

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    5 - Nisquallia olympica nymph photographed a few feet from the edge of melting snow.

    07/03/2009 Obstruction Point Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    6 - Nisquallia olympica nymph photographed a few feet from the edge of melting snow. The is the same individual as in slide 5.

    07/03/2009 Obstruction Point Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    7 - Nisquallia olympica nymph on Piper’s Bellflower Campanula piperi, an endemic flower of the Olympic mountains.

    07/03/2009 Obstruction Point Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    8 - Nisquallia olympica nymph photographed near the edge of melting snow.

    07/23/2010 Obstruction Point Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    9 - Nisquallia olympica nymph photographed near the edge of melting snow. Probably the same individual as in slide 8.

    07/23/2010 Obstruction Point Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    10 - Nisquallia olympica nymphal exuvia, front and side views. The external skeleton splits along the back as the nymph emerges.

    09/04/2011 Specimen collected Sunrise Ridge Trail, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    11 - Nisquallia olympica nymph. Scan of an Ektachrome slide.

    June 1985 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

In all of the locations where we find adult Nisquallia, the first individuals to appear are nymphs. Nymphs seem to appear as soon as the snow melts, and we sometimes see them within feet of the melting snow edge.

Like all insects, Nisquallia molts as it matures. On one hike, we found the exuvia of a female nymph (slide 10).

Also see Emergence in the Nisquallia menu.