ONH

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  • Content Slide
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    1 - Nisquallia olympica emerging from the ground after hatching.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    2 - Nisquallia olympica emerging from the ground after hatching.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    3 - Nisquallia olympica emerging from the ground after hatching.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    4 - Nisquallia olympica emerge one by one from underground.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    5 - Nisquallia olympica after emerging and rolling downhill a few inches. They’re still struggling to escape the whitish covering.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    6 - Nisquallia olympica after emerging and rolling downhill a few inches. They’re still struggling to escape the whitish covering.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    7 - Nisquallia olympica after pushing off the whitish covering, they’re able to walk and jump immediately.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    8 - After pushing off the whitish covering, they’re able to walk and jump immediately, even though they are only a few millimeters long.

    06/25/2014 Upper Wolf Creek Trail, Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park, Washington

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9 - This Nisquallia olympica has just emerged from an underground egg.

On 06/25/14, we were lucky enough to observe ten or more first instar Nisquallia olympica emerging from the ground after hatching from underground eggs.

We walked down the upper part of the Wolf Creek Trail, from the Hurricane Hill road in Olympic National Park. Just when the trail opens into a south-facing slope, with rocks, scree and some soil, we noticed movement on the soil. A closer look revealed Nisquallia olympica, emerging one by one from a small hole in the ground. The hole was on a slope, and as they emerged, they would roll downhill several inches. Once they shed a thin, whitish covering and inflated a bit, they were able to jump. Once expanded they were only a few millimeters long, and quite pale. After we photographed and videorecorded, and all emerging stopped, we dug out two egg cases. Compare to Nisquallia egg cases collected from a terrarium (see Eggs in the Nisquallia menu).