Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae)
Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae)
Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae)
Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae)
Long-horned Beetles (Cerambycidae)
Red-oak Borer larva

Long-horned beetles Cerambycidae

Long-horned beetles are common on the north Olympic Peninsula in the spring and summer. We see them on flowers or just sitting on the shingles of our house.

Images 1 and 2 are the Whitespotted Sawyer Monochamus scutellatus, on Hurricane Hill in Olympic National Park and on a flower in our yard at about 2,000 feet elevation near Olympic National Park’s Heart O’ the Hills Campground. This species shows the long antennae with long segments typical of the family.

Image 3 shows the Yellow Velvet Long-horned Beetle Cosmosalia chrysocoma, which we also see in the mountains and in our yard, as here.

In photo 4, two cerambycids mate on a flower in our yard. Zooming in on this photo, you can the transparent sperm-transfer tube.

Image 5 is Necydalis laevicollis.

Cerambycid larvae, such as the Red-oak Borer larva (Enaphalodes rufulus), image 6, can be very destructive to trees, chewing out huge galleries under the bark. I took these photos during a field trip in Arkansas in 2004 as part of a CASW meeting. (See Fred Stephens’ site for more about Red-oak Borers. See CASW New Horizons for more on the meetings.)