ONH

  • 1500
  • 6188
  • 0007
  • 0010
  • 1290504
  • 6200
  • 6200cu
  • 6208
  • 6217
  • 6226
  • 1280090
  • 1290412
  • 1290102
  • 1500
    1 - Sierra Dome Spider, Neriene litigiosa, female.

    09/25/2010 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6188
    2 - Sierra Dome Spider, Neriene litigiosa, male.

    08/13/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 0007
    3 - Sierra Dome Spider web.

    09/17/2010 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 0010
    4 - Sierra Dome Spider web.

    09/17/2010 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1290504
    5 - Sierra Dome Spider web near the top of a Hemlock tree.

    08/20/2020 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6200
    6 - Sierra Dome Spider, two females.

    08/13/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6200cu
    7 - Sierra Dome Spider, two females closeup.

    08/13/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6208
    8 - Sierra Dome Spider female, ventral side.

    08/13/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6217
    9 - Sierra Dome Spider female.

    08/15/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6226
    10 - Sierra Dome Spider female.

    08/15/2011 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1280090
    11 - Sierra Dome Spider female.

    08/08/2020 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1290412
    12 - Sierra Dome Spider male approaches a female.

    08/14/2020 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1290102
    13 - Sierra Dome Spider male initiates sperm transfer.

    08/14/2020 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

Sierra Dome Spiders, Neriene litigiosa, build sheet webs more or less in the shape of a dome with an internal flat platform. The female, about 7 mm long (excluding the legs), hangs upside down in the web waiting for prey. The silk in these webs is so fine that they’re nearly invisible except when covered with dew.

In some circumstances—for example in low or widespread populations—females deposit a pheremone on their webs to attract males. A male may remove the pheremone-scented silk after mating to prevent other males from being attracted. See “The Case of the Missing Perfume” on The Animal Communication Project

Sierra Dome Spiders on bugguide.net