ONH

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  • 3660
  • 4616
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  • 1060681
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  • 3650
    1 - Habronattus hirsutus male.

    04/14/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    2 - Habronattus hirsutus male, same individual as in slide 2

    04/14/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    3 - Habronattus hirsutus female, same individual in slides 3-5..

    04/22/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    4 - Habronattus hirsutusfemale, same individual in slides 3-5.

    04/22/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    5 - Habronattus hirsutusfemale, same individual in slides 3-5.

    04/22/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    6 - Habronattus hirsutus male. The characteristic foreleg flag of bristles is clearly visible.

    04/14/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    7 - Habronattus hirsutus male.

    04/14/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    8 - Habronattus hirsutus female.

    04/19/2010 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    9 - Habronattus hirsutus male on a dried leaf.

    05/22/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    10 - Habronattus hirsutus male.

    03/31/2013 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    11 - Habronattus hirsutusmale.

    04/29/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

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    12 - Habronattus hirsutusmale in a typical environment at the mouth of the Elwha river. The male is on the rock in the center of the image.

    04/29/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

  • 4094
    13 - Habronattus hirsutus female, close up of epigynum, the anatomical feature often required for positive identification of many spiders.

    specimen collected 04/22/2009 Mouth of the Elwha River, Port Angeles, Washington

    The Habronattus hirsutus mating page (see menu) shows several mating pairs and the display behavior of the male.

Habronattus hirsutus jumping spiders are common on rocks and sand near fresh-water beaches of the North Olympic Peninsula. They are abundant on the river beach of the mouth of the Elwha river.

Males have distinctive color and bristle features that make them easy to identify, using close photos or butterfly binoculars. Females are more difficult to identify because females of several jumping spider species look quite similar. Some of the females identified here were confirmed as Habronattus hirsutus by Rod Crawford of the University of Washington’s Burke Museum. Slide 6 shows the epigynum close up, photographed under alcohol.

The Habronattus hirsutus mating page (see menu) shows several mating pairs and the display behavior of the male.