ONH

  • 6385
  • 6639
  • 5422
  • 5439
  • 0319
  • 0330
  • 1160656
  • 1160696
  • 7433
  • 7541
  • 5923
  • 8948
  • 1240516
  • 6871
  • 6867
  • 1190621
  • 1190801
  • 1520758
  • 1520759
  • 1520760
  • 6420
  • 6420cu
  • habstamp
  • 6385
    1 - Habronattus americanus male. Note the irridescent clypeus, just below the front eyes. It can look shiny turquoise or sea green, or dull, depending on the incident light.

    05/15/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 6639
    2 - Habronattus americanus male.

    05/15/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 5422
    3 - Habronattus americanus female. Her eyes look somewhat oval because of the dark “eye shadow” below the eyes.

    05/01/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 5439
    4 - Habronattus americanus, the same female as in slide 3.

    05/01/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 0319
    5 - Habronattus americanus female with prey.

    09/11/2008 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 0330
    6 - Habronattus americanus the same female as shown in slide 5.

    05/01/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 1160656
    7 - Habronattus americanus male with prey, a Picture-winged fly, still alive when this photo was taken.

    09/09/2013 Sunrise Ridge Trail, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1160696
    8 - Habronattus americanus, the same individual as shown in slide 7. The male had jumped with the fly off the stem and onto a rock.

    09/09/2013 Sunrise Ridge Trail, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 7433
    9 - Habronattus americanus female with prey, a heleomyzid fly.

    05/23/2009 Point Wilson Beach, Fort Worden State Park, Washington

  • 7541
    10 - Habronattus americanus male.

    05/23/2009Point Wilson Beach, Fort Worden State Park, Washington

  • 5923
    11 - Habronattus americanus female. We have noticed that the pattern on the abdomen of different females is not identical. Compare, for example, individuals in slides 11 -14.

    05/09/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 8948
    12 - Habronattus americanus female.

    07/10/2010 Hurricane Hill Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1240516
    13 - Habronattus americanus female.

    07/08/2014 Hurricane Hill Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6871
    14 - Habronattus americanus female.

    05/16/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 6867
    15 - Habronattus americanus the same female as in slide 14.

    05/16/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 1190621
    16 - Habronattus americanus male.

    05/01/2014 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 1190801
    17 - Habronattus americanus male.

    05/01/2014 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 1520758
    18 - Habronattus americanus female jumps from rock to rock, 1 of 3 images.

    07/10/2010 Hurricane Hill Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1520759
    19 - Habronattus americanus female jumps from rock to rock, 2 of 3 images.

    07/10/2010 Hurricane Hill Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 1520760
    20 - Habronattus americanus female jumps from rock to rock, 3 of 3 images.

    07/10/2010 Hurricane Hill Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

  • 6420
    21 - Habronattus americanus male displaying to female, top, with a second male visible at the bottom of the image, some 18 inches away.

    05/15/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • 6420cu
    22 - Habronattus americanus male displaying to female, closeup of slide 21.

    05/15/2009 Port Williams County Park, Sequim, Washington

  • habstamp
    23 - The Post Office has honored Habronattus americanus with a stamp in the Insects & Spiders set. Copyright © 2009 United States Postal Service. Steve Buchanan, artist.

We first saw this colorful 5.5 mm jumping spider in summer 2008 at the edge of a trail near the top of Blue Mountain, in Olympic National Park (elevation about 6,000 feet). The characteristic red color on the legs and pedipalps—part of a red, white and blue color scheme—led to identification of the male. We have photographed H. americanus in other mountain locations and on logs on sea-level beaches.

Every time we’ve seen Habronattus americanus, we’ve seen both males and females in the same location. Dr. Wayne Maddison, University of British Columbia, confirmed the female identification from my photos. (See Maddison Jumping Spider Courtship.)

(Thanks to bugguide and Dr. Matthias Buck for identification of the fly in slide 9.)