Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
Habronattus hirsutus mating 1

Habronattus hirsutus mating 1
display video, in the field
approach video, in the lab

While I’ve photographed Habronattus hirsutus many times at the mouth of the Elwha river, I never saw a pair mating before April 2010. This pair, mating on top of a freshwater beach log, ignored me while I took a dozen or so photos, and I only disturbed them when I collected them live in a small jar for further study at home. After a couple of days, I returned them to the same log I originally found them on.

Image 1 shows that the female rotates her abdomen 90 degrees while mating. The characteristic white markings visible near the end of her abdomen are on the dorsal surface. Image 2 shows the male using his pedipalps to insert sperm into the female’s genital opening, located on the underside of the abdomen near where it joins the cephalothorax.

Image 5 shows a male displaying to a female who was on another rock about 25 cm away. I took this photo in mid May 2011, also at the mouth of the Elwha river.

This video, taken in May 2013, shows a male displaying. The sound is the Elwha river.

I made a video (6) while the pair shown in images 1-4 was in a small petri dish on my microscope desk. In addition to a modest foreleg display, you can (just barely) see that the male is vibrating his abdomen on the surface. He begins vibrating when he approaches the female.

See Seismic signals in a courting male jumping spider, for example. The web site for the Elias Lab, at Berkeley, has many wonderful videos of jumping spider behavior.
The short video on this ONH page shows Habronattus americanus drumming on a log with a female nearby.
Also see Maddison Jumping Spider Courtship for many wonderful videos.