ONH

  • 8471
  • 8474
  • 8480
  • 8483
  • 8491
  • 8496
  • 1240074
  • 1120690
  • 1120701
  • 8471
    1 - False Black Widow, Steatoda albomaculata, female, same individual in slides 1-3.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 8474
    2 - False Black Widow, female, same individual in slides 1-3.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 8480
    3 - False Black Widow, female, same individual in slides 1-3.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 8483
    4 - False Black Widow, male, same individual in slides 4-7. This male was nearby the female shown in slides 1-3.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 8491
    5 - False Black Widow, male, same individual in slides 4-7.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 8496
    6 - False Black Widow, male, same individual in slides 4-7.

    09/20/2011 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 1240074
    7 - False Black Widow, female.

    07/02/2014 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 1120690
    8 - False Black Widow, female.

    06/06/2015 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

  • 1120701
    9 - False Black Widow, female, same individual as in slide 7.

    06/06/2015 Blue Mountain/Deer Park, Olympic National Park

The false black widow is in the same family as the famous Black Widow, Theridiidae. It is native to Europe, not North America, but has become common on the whole Pacific Coast. Some species are common in houses. They have mild venom and a bite can cause symptoms similar to a mild black widow bite.