ONH

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    1 - Washington Salamander, Plethodon vandykei vandykei.

    04/28/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    2 - Washington Salamanders are well camouflaged among moss and damp sticks.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    3 - Washington Salamander.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    4 - Washington Salamander.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    5 - Washington Salamander.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    6 - This individual is a female. Note the lack of a groove from the nostril to the lip (nasolabial groove). The yellow throat is also distintive for this species.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    7 - Four front toes.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

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    8 - Five rear toes.

    04/29/2005 Heart O' the Hills Area, Olympic National Park, Washington

The Washington Salamander, a subspecies of Van Dyke’s Salmander, is much less common in our neck of the woods than is the Rough-skinned Newt.

Washington Salamanders can be identified by the slim body; smooth, slimy skin; short toes; and the yellow color under the chin. This individual is a female, identified by the lack of a nasolabial groove.